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Bee Culture

Cover Crops Benefit Everyone

Cover Crops Benefit Both Commercial Farmers and Urban Gardeners NRCS National Plant Materials Center (PMC) staff David Kidwell-Slak (PMC Manager), Shawn Belt (Horticulturist), and Dan Dusty (Farm Manager).   By Nancy McNiff, Strategic Communications Coordinator, Farm Production and Conservation Business Center Increasingly, farmers and even urban and backyard gardeners are realizing that cover crops are critical to their operations and…
UOVBA News Bot
January 17, 2022
American Bee Journal

Can Bees Make Funny Honey?

Cannabis is becoming a prevalent crop, but it doesn’t mean your honey will have a buzz I live in British Columbia’s Fraser River delta, surrounded by agricultural land. The usual crops of hay, corn, blueberries, pumpkins, peas, and potatoes abound. But in the last two years, a new plant has made an appearance in the landscape: cannabis. In Canada, recreational…
UOVBA News Bot
January 17, 2022
American Bee Journal

Two Pollination Myths We Love to Believe

It’s hard to know the truth about anything. At the inception of the internet, we imagined unlimited access to a world of information. The dissemination of knowledge would be boundless, allowing each of us to read and consider multiple viewpoints before drawing our own fact-based conclusions. It sounds like heaven. It used to be that advertising was the premier influencer…
UOVBA News Bot
January 17, 2022
American Bee Journal

Using fewer insecticides improves crop yield by increasing pollination by bees

The vast majority of farmers use chemical insecticides to protect their crops against potentially damaging insect pests. This should not be a foreign concept to beekeepers; the majority of beekeepers use miticides to protect their bees against the varroa mite. But how farmers use insecticides varies greatly. Some farmers operate on a schedule, applying insecticides every month or so to…
UOVBA News Bot
January 17, 2022
American Bee Journal

The Classroom – January 2022

Q  Small Drones  One of my colonies in Southern California was requeened over a month ago (I requeen in the fall as part of brood break and IPM) and at the time of requeening, about 10% of the colony was comprised of normal sized drones which I consider to be appropriate for this time of year. The hive is a…
UOVBA News Bot
January 17, 2022