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American Bee Journal

Don’t Panic, Its Organic! Or Is It? Demystifying the term “organic” in honey bees

Many beekeepers use terms like raw, natural, local, and organic to describe their honey. These words are great for marketing, and show that beekeepers understand that today’s consumer is savvy to honey fraud and contamination concerns. One of these terms is not like the others, however. While any beekeeper using any practice can technically use the terms raw, natural, and…
UOVBA News Bot
November 15, 2020
American Bee Journal

Respiration and Circulation in Honey Bees

Except for a recently discovered parasite of salmon, all animals require oxygen for survival and expel carbon dioxide as a waste product.1 Because animals are so varied, many breathing systems have evolved throughout the animal kingdom, each one designed to work in an animal’s particular environment. Depending on its size and habitat, an animal may employ direct diffusion, gills, lungs,…
UOVBA News Bot
November 15, 2020
American Bee Journal

Notes from the Lab – November 2020

Increasing use of land for crops in the United States negatively impacts wildlife while producing marginal benefits for farmers In any competition, there are winners and losers. This is abundantly clear in sports, of course, when one team wins the championship and the other loses. But it’s also true in normal life. For example, when natural habitat that supports wildlife…
UOVBA News Bot
November 15, 2020
American Bee Journal

Queen Introduction: Part 6 A Practical Queen Introduction Method

We finish up this queen introduction series with a method that I recommend. I realize beekeepers have numerous ways to introduce queens. In historical beekeeping, even more queen introduction methods abound. In 1948, L.E. Snelgrove published “The Introduction of Queen Bees,” a book on the subject. Consider now a practical, familiar, and reliable method, drawing on the results of the…
UOVBA News Bot
November 15, 2020
American Bee Journal

The Pesticide Paradox

Other insects have readily developed resistance to pesticides, but honey bees are slow to act Everywhere we look, from antibiotics to chemotherapies to miticides, we find biological resistance to our attempts at chemical control. Perhaps this phenomenon is most dangerous to us in the world of bacterial infections, where, for example, once-easily-treated pathogens like Staphylococcus aureus can now cause life-threatening…
UOVBA News Bot
November 15, 2020